Etiquette in rural areas. What do you do when passing a total stranger whilst out walking? Do you always say “Good morning. Lovely day”? Or do you keep your head down, perhaps look the other way and pass silently? Experience suggests that most people do speak, but there is a sizeable minority who “prefer” not to speak. Each to his own is probably the answer, but in days of yore, everybody in the countryside exchanged greetings with others whenever they met.

South Glos Council, like many others, is recommending that people do not have bonfires at the present time as the smoke and chemicals can be harmful to health.

Now is probably also a good time to remind everyone that it is illegal to cut hedges and trees if doing so endangers wild birds or their nests. This applies between 1st March to 31st July under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. So please, even if you are running out of jobs to do around the garden, your hedges are currently sacrosanct.

A New England Series:                                                                                                                               “I think that some of the customs we have come to regard during this crisis will remain with us after lockdown is lifted. It’s probable that families will spend more time together than they did before CV19.  There  is likely to be a speeding up of the move towards a cashless society, it was already on the way but with shopkeepers only accepting cards, it’s bound to become the new norm.  The older generation has been forced to use the internet much more, and probably quite like it. Online banking, Zoom conferencing with family, emailing friends – the technology reaching out to a generation sometimes reluctant to use it.   My big concern is the global economy, I just can’t see how it is all going to pan out.”                             Source: A security consultant.

Church humour: A devout farmer loses the bible he has carried with him for life, in the fields. Three days later, a cow wanders up to him with said bible in its mouth. Ecstatic and grateful the farmer raises his arms to heaven and shouts “It’s a miracle, praise be to the Lord!”. The cow replies “Not really, your name is written inside.”